You don’t have to take on multiple myeloma alone

We know it takes a full support system to take on multiple myeloma. And we’re here to explore a potential way to fight it with you.

The MagnetisMM clinical research studies will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a study medicine, elranatamab, in people with multiple myeloma. Participating in a study is an important and personal decision. We want you to know that we will be with you every step of the way.
Card Summary Component

Participating in these studies

Each MagnetisMM study will have its own unique requirements for who may participate called eligibility criteria.

The requirements may include your stage of multiple myeloma as well as any previous treatments you may have received.

You can talk with the study doctor to find out which study may be right for you.

Condition

Multiple myeloma

The disease, disorder, syndrome, illness, or injury that is being studied. On ClinicalTrials.gov, conditions may also include other health-related issues, such as lifespan, quality of life, and health risks.

Age

18+ years

The age a person must be to participate in at least one of the studies in this program.

Sex

Male or Female

The sex of people who may participate in at least one of the studies in this program. Sex is a person’s classification based on assignment at birth. Eligibility based on sex is distinct from eligibility based on gender.

This information is a summary of the eligibility criteria across the studies in this program. Each study will have its own unique requirements for who may participate called eligibility criteria. To learn more about the requirements for a study that is actively recruiting, visit the study’s webpage below. Only the research study staff can determine if you qualify to enroll in the study.

MagnetisMM clinical trials
Recruiting
MagnetisMM-4—for people who have tried at least three prior treatments

Phase 1b study that will assess elranatamab taken in combination with nirogacestat or in combination with other drugs used to treat multiple myeloma

Recruiting
MagnetisMM-9—for people who have tried and have not responded well to at least three classes of prior treatments

A phase 1/2 study that will assess elranatamab taken alone

Recruiting
MagnetisMM-20—for people who have tried one to three prior treatments

A phase 1b study assessing elranatamab in combination with carfilzomib plus dexamethasone

Not yet recruiting
MagnetisMM-5—for people who have tried at least two prior treatments

A phase 3 study assessing elranatamab alone or in combination with daratumumab compared to standard therapy

Not yet recruiting
MagnetisMM-6—for people who have been newly diagnosed and are not eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT)

A phase 3 study that will assess elranatamab, daratumumab, and lenalidomide versus daratumumab, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone

Not yet recruiting
MagnetisMM-7—for people who have been newly diagnosed after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT)

A phase 3 study that will assess elranatamab versus lenalidomide

Recruitment completed
MagnetisMM-1—for people who have tried at least three prior treatments

A phase 1 study that will assess elranatamab taken alone and in combination with other medicines

Recruitment completed
MagnetisMM-3—for people who have tried and have not responded well to at least three classes of prior treatments

A phase 2 study that will assess elranatamab taken alone

Frequently asked questions

What is multiple myeloma?

Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that forms in bone marrow. Healthy bone marrow produces plasma cells, which make antibodies to fight infection. But in multiple myeloma, plasma cells become cancerous. These cancer cells can crowd out normal blood cells, forming tumors and leaving a person vulnerable to infection.

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How does this study medicine work?

The study medicine, elranatamab, is thought to work by connecting certain immune system cells, known as T-cells, to myeloma cells (cancer cells). Connecting these cells activates the immune cells, potentially killing the myeloma cells.

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How do treatment options for multiple myeloma work?

Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) help adjust the immune response to kill cancer cells or make it difficult for them to grow. Anti-CD38 antibodies such as daratumumab kill cancer cells and may alter the immune response. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) kill cancer cells by causing excess protein to build up inside of them. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) antibodies target a protein found on the surface of myeloma cells.

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What do relapse and refractory mean?

Relapse is when a treatment works for a while and then stops. Refractory is when a disease doesn’t respond to treatment. Relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma refers to multiple myeloma that either comes back after responding to treatment or doesn’t respond to treatment at all.

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Will I have to pay to be in the study? Will my insurance cover the cost?

The study medicine and all study-related care and procedures are provided at no cost. You don’t need health insurance to join a clinical study. However, you (or your health insurance provider) may be responsible for medical expenses that are part of your usual healthcare. Talk with your study team or review the informed consent document to find out exactly what is covered.

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Is there travel support available for participants in this study?

Travel to the study center and other expenses (such as meals) may be covered. Please discuss the details with your study team.

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Will my personal information be kept private?

Your health information and any data that could be used to identify you (such as immigration status) will be kept private and safe. Only information that relates to the study will be collected, and only your study team, study doctor, and organizations that oversee the study will be able to access it. Your personal information won’t be shared with third parties such as the government or advertisers.

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What will happen to my personal information after the study ends?

All records and documents pertaining to the study will be kept for at least 15 years. Some samples may be stored indefinitely.
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About multiple myeloma

About multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that forms in your bone marrow. Multiple myeloma starts when healthy plasma cells change and grow at a rapid pace.

  • Abnormal (myeloma or cancer) plasma cells overcrowd and/or prevent the creation and growth of healthy plasma cells and other cells within the bone marrow
  • Like healthy plasma cells, myeloma cells create antibodies; however, the antibodies don't work properly, lowering your body's ability to fight infection

Abnormal plasma cells also build up in your bones and organs, making it difficult for them to work properly.

About the study medicine

About the study medicine

The MagnetisMM studies will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the study medicine, elranatamab, which will be given as a subcutaneous (SC) injection. An SC injection is a needle inserted under the skin in order to deliver the study medicine.

Elranatamab is thought to work by connecting certain immune system cells, known as T-cells, to myeloma cells. Connecting these cells activates the immune cells to kill the myeloma cells.

The importance of representation

The importance of representation

Diversity among study participants is important in order to understand whether potential treatments work in different people. Race, ethnicity, age, and sex can all impact how different people respond to the same treatment.

When groups of people aren’t well represented in research, we cannot know if the study medicine may work properly for all the people it is trying to help.

When you take part in a study, you’re helping to represent both your community and all people who are affected by multiple myeloma.